Tuesday, May 23, 2017

The LLAMA podcast episode 13: James Cole

People with a brain age older than their bodies could be at greater risk of dying early, according to a recent study. Dr. James Cole, a neuroscientist at Imperial College London, led a research project using MRI scans and a computer program to predict a person’s brain age. 

The system, which is still in development, could help spot people whose lifestyles put them at greater risk of poor health and early death. LLAMA host Peter Bowes visited Hammersmith Hospital in London for this in-depth interview with Dr. Cole, who explains how data for the study was collected and how the findings could be used to help people live longer lives. 

He also discusses what some people call “the mosaic of aging”, the idea that different tissues and systems in the body can age at a different pace. 

Listen to the podcast here

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

The LLAMA podcast episode 13: Leslie Saxon

Implanted devices that monitor the internal functioning of our bodies, in minute detail, could soon be part of our daily lives. 

Many of us already take for granted the wearable gadgets and apps we use to keep track of exercise and food intake. Technological advances in the field of body computing are moving quickly and are about to revolutionize the way we manage aging and everyday wellbeing. 

Dr. Leslie Saxon is a professor of clinical medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC). She specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias and the prevention of sudden cardiac death. The founder and executive director of USC’s Center for Body Computing and the newly formed USC Virtual Care Clinic, Dr. Saxon is a global authority on the development of wearable and implanted technology. 

In this in-depth interview, she discusses the potential for body computing to enhance our lives and longevity.

Listen to the podcast here

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

The LLAMA podcast episode 12: Steven Eisenberg

Living a healthy lifestyle goes a long way towards reducing the chances of an early death, but some diseases still strike with little warning and deadly effect. You can do everything right and still get cancer. 

Dr. Steven Eisenberg is an oncologist, based in the California city of San Diego. Board-certified in internal medicine, medical oncology and hematology, he has been recognized for his compassionate bedside manner. He is best known for singing to his patients. Not only does he burst into song on the ward, he writes heart-lifting and personalized lyrics for his patients. 

In this in-depth interview he talks about his desire to provide an empathetic environment for people as they face up to their diagnosis. Dr. Eisenberg also shares his thoughts on the roles of diet, exercise and mindfulness in cancer prevention.

Listen to the podcast here.

Friday, May 5, 2017

The LLAMA podcast episode 11: Edith Avise

Edith Johnson Avise recently moved into a care home, at the age of 100. After a lifetime of independent living, she is finding it difficult to adapt to her new surroundings. The home, in Southern California, is comfortable and safe, but Edith still has a spirited attitude towards life. She enjoyed a successful career as an agricultural educator, or extension worker, in her home state of Michigan. She traveled the country and worked closely with 4-H, the youth organization that teaches young people life skills through practical programs. 

In this candid interview Edith shares her life experiences and wisdom. She reveals what she considers to be the key tenets to living a long and healthy life and puts into context the value of living to a ripe old age. Edith is sharp, quick-witted, and remarkably honest.

Listen to the podcast here

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

The LLAMA podcast episode 10: Paul Irving

Paul Irving has no intention of ever retiring. As chairman of the Milken Institute’s Center for the Future of Aging, he is a leading campaigner in what has become known as the purposeful aging movement. A lawyer and former president of the Santa Monica-based Institute, Paul is an advocate for the elderly population, whom he sees as a talented and “dramatically underutilized” resource for society. Author of The Upside of Aging: How Long Life Is Changing the World of Health, Work, Innovation, Policy and Purpose, he says longevity is creating an entirely new definition of what it is like to be old. From going back to school in your sixties to romances springing up late in life, Paul views aging with relish and optimism. 

In this in-depth interview, he explains why he considers aging, along with climate change, to be the “great challenge of the 21st century”. He also discusses the Institute’s upcoming global conference, ‘Building Meaningful Lives,’ taking place in Los Angeles from April 30-May 3, 2017.

Listen to the podcast here