Wednesday, April 28, 2021

Kathleen O'Brien: Writer & broadcaster


The art of growing old, gracefully and purposefully, preferably in rude health, is unique to us all. The journey, with its many twists and turns, involves myriad emotions, adventures and challenges.   But Kathleen O'Brien says the process has been somewhat hijacked by society's growing disrespect for the elderly. In her book, Reclaim Your Right To Grow Old, the American writer and broadcaster explores the history of attitudes towards aging and suggests that society's fevered quest for longevity is misguided.  In this LLAMA podcast conversation with Peter Bowes, Kathleen argues that the happiness to be found in aging is being undervalued; that the eccentricities of older people should be celebrated and the joy of smelling the roses more often enjoyed. 

Recorded: April 12, 2021 | Read a transcript and show notes at the LLAMA podcast website.

Topics covered in this interview include:
  • Kathleen's voice was once very familiar to Americans  - how come? 
  • Approaching the "sad ride on the down slope" and discovering a new way to look at aging. 
  • Exploring the history of aging and the attitudes of ancient cultures, especially towards 'elders.'
  • What the location of graveyards tells us about changing attitudes towards older people and death
  • Is 'keep busy, keep active' necessarily a positive message, as people age. 
  • The 'reclaim your right to grow' old philosophy
  • Embracing the eccentricities aging - being free to be who we want to be. 
  • Smell the roses and worry less
  • Death anxiety, spirituality and changing attitudes as we age
This episode is brought to you in association with JUVICELL, the all-in-one longevity supplement that contains 10 key ingredients shown to have a positive impact on healthspan, as validated by scientific studies. To find out more, visit juvicell.com

The Live Long and Master Aging podcast, a HealthSpan Media LLC production, shares ideas but does not offer medical advice.  If you have health concerns of any kind, or you are considering adopting a new diet or exercise regime, you should consult your doctor.

Wednesday, April 21, 2021

Jason Karlawish: Gerontologist



There has been "spectacular" progress in recent years in the understanding and treatment of Alzheimer's.  The progressive disease, which is the most common cause of dementia, a late-in-life decline in memory and cognitive ability, afflicts 50 million people around the world. Taking family members and other carers into account, that number increases exponentially.  The condition, for which there is currently no cure,  amounts to a modern day crisis, for all involved. In this episode of the LLAMA podcast, Dr Jason Karlawish, a gerontologist and professor of medicine and medical ethics and senior fellow of the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania, says significant gains are being made with therapeutic treatments, but many hurdles remain.  The author of The Problem of Alzheimer's: How Science, Culture and Politics turned a Rare Disease into a Crisis, also argues that Alzheimer's is disease of our identity and a condition that raises fundamental, moral questions about what it means to lead a good life. 

Recorded: March 30, 2021 | Read a transcript and show notes at the LLAMA podcast website.

Topics covered in this interview include:
  • The difference between demential and Alzheimer's disease.
  • How can dementia be distinguished from the 'normal course of aging?"
  • The work of the Penn Memory Center, with patients and their loved ones. 
  • Explaining medicine in the 'real world,' through the stories and experiences of people.
  • Why patients and caregivers are the best teachers. 
  • Distinguishing between disease and disability. 
  • How stigma haunts the lives of people with dementia. 
  • Defining Alzheimers as once a rare disease, now a crisis. 
  • The "spectacular progress in science," dealing with Alzheimer's. 
  • "Living' with Alzheimer's rather than relying on drugs. 
  • Why is the risk of demential declining? 
  • The crisis of good quality care for Alzheimer's patients in the U.S.
  • Regular exercise and a heart healthy diet to maintain good brain health.  Red wine too? 
This episode is brought to you in association with JUVICELL, the all-in-one longevity supplement that contains 10 key ingredients shown to have a positive impact on healthspan, as validated by scientific studies. To find out more, visit juvicell.com

The Live Long and Master Aging podcast, a HealthSpan Media LLC production, shares ideas but does not offer medical advice.  If you have health concerns of any kind, or you are considering adopting a new diet or exercise regime, you should consult your doctor.

Wednesday, April 14, 2021

Lisa Levine: Embracing midlife without a crisis



Turning fifty can be a wrenching experience for some people.  Others discover that it is their sixtieth birthday that conjures up disturbing emotions. There is no doubt that big birthdays focus the mind on the aging process and what is often described as a midlife crisis.  But should we fear the passage of time?  Lisa Levine is a life coach and the author of Midlife No crisis, an insightful and entertaining exploration of the years that signpost our lives.  In this LLAMA podcast conversation with Peter Bowes, Lisa explains why we should embrace "transformative" periods, instead of dreading them, and how the advancing years can propel us in a "more fulfilling direction," with excitement and optimism. 

Recorded: April 5, 2021 | Read a transcript and show notes at the LLAMA podcast website.

Topics covered in this interview include:
  • When does mid-life happen and why is it associated with a crisis for some people.
  • Pre-empting a mid-life crisis 
  • When the meaning  of life becomes more important that just doing a job. 
  • The difference between turning 50 and 60?
  • Leaving Hollywood and the entertainment business for a new calling - something deeper with more meaning. 
  • Becoming a life coach and "walking the talk." 
  • Dealing with health obstacles and fertility issues and discovering alternative therapies. 
  • Do men and women face the same mid-life issues? 
  • How our backgrounds and life experiences mold our lives and attitudes toward aging. 
  • Discovering the perks on midlife, wisdom and putting space between negative thoughts.
  • The value of friends and community in dealing with the aging process - knowing that you're not alone. 
  • Social media - compare and despair. Avoiding the rabbit holes. 
  • The privilege that is aging. 
This episode is brought to you in association with JUVICELL, the all-in-one longevity supplement that contains 10 key ingredients shown to have a positive impact on healthspan, as validated by scientific studies. To find out more, visit juvicell.com

The Live Long and Master Aging podcast shares ideas but does not offer medical advice.  If you have health concerns of any kind, or you are considering adopting a new diet or exercise regime, you should consult your doctor.

Wednesday, April 7, 2021

Amy Temperley: Founder, Aging is Cool


Living life to the full, at any age, has been a challenge recently.  To put it mildly.  But if Covid has taught us anything, it is that some of life's simplest pleasures are what make life itself worth living. Therein lies a metaphor for healthy aging.  Physical fitness, social contact and an active mind go a long way towards helping us live longer and better.  They are also central to the ideals of Aging is Cool, a Texas-based company that helps people over fifty stay active and engaged as they age. 

In this LLAMA episode, Aging is Cool co-founder, Amy Temperley, explains why she rails against a modern-day culture rife with ageism and how she hopes to redefine what it means to grow old. 

"Old is a feeling and I don't know that you're old until you decide that you're old," she says.  

In conversation with Peter Bowes, Amy also reveals how life with Covid has opened her eyes to the everyday activities that bring pleasure and purpose to life. 

Recorded: March 22, 2021 | Read a transcript and show notes at the LLAMA podcast website.

Topics covered in this interview include:
  • Targeting healthy, active aging and coming up with the idea for Aging is Cool
  • Realizing that aging can be positive, celebrating a robust zest for life and it is okay to get older.  
  • Is there a benchmark for becoming old
  • Anti-aging versus finding a sense of purpose in life. 
  • Building a company focussed on mind and body training for older adults
  • A Mighty Good Time -  a one-stop-shop and mostly virtual resource for adults aged 50+
  • Over fifty - is there a mindset change? 
  • Reducing social isolation through involvement in a community
  • The value of friendship and forging new relationships
  • Social interaction post Covid and find new joy-inducing pastimes. How making stuff can be fun. 
  • Advocacy for the benefits of a healthy, aging population. 
  • Breaking out of Covid, socializing more and multi-generational friendships. 
  • Morning rituals that include caring for dogs. 
  • Finding those things that make life worth living - "embracing the things you love rather than lamenting what you've lost."
This episode is brought to you in association with JUVICELL, the all-in-one longevity supplement that contains 10 key ingredients shown to have a positive impact on healthspan, as validated by scientific studies. To find out more, visit juvicell.com

The Live Long and Master Aging podcast shares ideas but does not offer medical advice.  If you have health concerns of any kind, or you are considering adopting a new diet or exercise regime, you should consult your doctor.